Reconciliation at CASS at a Glance

Introduction

CASS is committed to improving engagement with Indigenous Australians in line with the forthcoming ANU Reconciliation Action Plan. To work towards this vision the College will develop its own reconciliation action plan in 2018 in response to the ANU Reconciliation Action Plan. The College has a history of engaging in University initiatives to promote reconciliation and has the longest-running RAP Sub-Committee on campus. We encourage you to read the previous CASS Reconciliation Action Plan and engage in these important topics with us as we develop a vision for increasing engagement. The CASS Reconciliation Action Plan Sub-Committee meet at least quarterly and report on progress throughout the year.

We acknowledge and celebrate the First Australians on whose traditional lands we meet and work, and whose cultures are among the oldest continuing cultures in human history.

Members of this subcommittee are:

The College's commitment to reconciliation is broad in scope. Below we list some important information and some of our most obvious and targeted activities.

Scholarships

In addition to other scholarships, Graduate Students in CASS may also apply for the following scholarships and prizes:

Endowments

CASS is also the recipient of a number of endowments specific to Indigenous research teaching and engagement. They are:

Study and Research Options

Undergraduate Students may undertake a Bachelor of Arts with a major in Indigenous Studies.

Graduate Students can specialise in Indigenous Policy within the Master of Applied Anthropology and Participatory Development.

Graduate Research Students may also investigate Indigenous topics under the supervision of many experts within our college across the disciplines.

In addition CASS hosts two world class research centres:

Public Lecture

Our commitment to research is further enhanced by our Annual Public Lecture on Future Directions in Indigenous Research.

In 2013 this lecture was delivered by Jennifer Deger (School of History) on Digital Life.

In 2014 this lecture was given by Dr Melinda Hinkson (School of Archaeology and Anthropology) on Warlpiri drawings connect past and present.

In 2015 this lecture was given by Elizabeth Marrkilyi Ellis, Dr Inge Kral, Professor Jane Simpson and Dr Jennifer Green (School of Literature, Languages and Linguistics) on Being language: Roles, responsibility and respect in Ngaanyatjarra society

In 2016 this lecture was given by Dr Christopher Sainsbury (School of Music) on 'New Thoughts on Indigenous Music and the Australian Music Composition Scene' with a special performance by Michaele Archer (voice) and Giuseppe Zangari (guitar).

In 2017 this lecture was given by Tony Dreise (CAEPR PhD Candidate) on A Third Mission? Reimagining University-Indigenous Relationships Across Australia. 

Stay tuned for information on the Annual Public Lecture for 2018.

Acknowledgement of Country

It is university policy to begin all public events with an acknowledgment of traditional owners or a Welcome to Country.

The official wording for all ANU Acknowledgement of Country is:

We acknowledge and celebrate the First Australians on whose traditional lands we meet and work, and whose cultures are among the oldest continuing cultures in human history.

Ethical Research Guidelines

All researchers should be aware of the following ethical research guidelines:

Cultural Awareness

All staff are encouraged to undertake Indigenous Cultural Awareness Training. ANU Pulse provides staff and students access to free self-paced online learning course which can be completed at any time.

Other important centres at the ANU

For more information on reconciliation aims and activities in the College of Arts and Social Science contact the committee secretary Ms Elizabeth Raynor or the committee chair Dr Deirdre Howard-Wagner.

Updated:  26 March 2018/Responsible Officer:  CASS Marketing & Communications/Page Contact:  CASS Marketing & Communications