Master of Anthropology

Anthropology is the study of contemporary human cultural lives.In a globalised world, cross-cultural literacy and analysis have never been more important. The Master in Anthropology is a highly sought-after program that places very strong emphasis on anthropological theory and methods with the intention of turning out graduates ready to work in applied research contexts in the public and corporate sectors.

ANU is one of the world’s leading and highest ranked Universities for Anthropology. Globally, it has one of the highest concertation of Anthropologists. The Master of Anthropology is convened by the School of Archaeology and Anthropology but draws on anthropological expertise from across the College of Arts and Social Sciences, the College of Asia and Pacific and other schools and centres across campus.

Anthropology at ANU

This degree centres on anthropology’s ethnographic approach, which is employed to understand how people live their lives, on their own terms. Such an approach enables anthropologists to examine key global challenges and events, including:

  • Identity politics: Whether it is UK’s Brexit or “cultural training” for the armed forces, culture is increasingly seen as a symbolic resource which needs to be protected or appropriated. This places cultural practices squarely in the realm of politics (contestation over symbolic and material resources) and the economy (e.g. commodification of cultural objects). With its methodological emphasis on comparative cross-cultural analysis, anthropology is uniquely placed to study such processes
  • Increased social and cultural interaction: Interaction between social and cultural groups have increased considerably in our time. Tourism, labour migration, refugee flows, internet and social media are only a few examples of how cross-cultural distances have shortened significantly. Anthropology, with its focus on cultural dimensions of human relations, is central to the examination of this change
  • Decision making, power and authority: As numerous research show, formal decision-making practices, whether it is within small scale societies or large bureaucracies, are dependent on informal social relationships. Anthropology, with its methodological emphasis on participant observation, is uniquely positioned to capture such processes
  • Technology and its social use: Technological innovation dramatically alters social relationships and practices; yet includes a range of unintended consequences. Anthropology offers innovate ways in which to understand the intersection between technology and its social dimensions
  • The Anthropocene: Anthropogenic climate change places anthropology at the centre of inquiry relating to ecology, resources, consumption and the environment.

By choosing this program, you will receive a world-class and internationally recognised degree and learn from some of the leading archaeology researchers in the world. There is a mock excavation site on the ANU campus that develops students’ skills in excavating prehistoric and historic sites. Students receive the comprehensive training required to pursue a career in this exciting area.

Languages

Drawing on the university’s outstanding foreign language offerings, the degree includes more than twenty different languages as electives.

Further studies

Master of Anthropology (Advanced)

In this advanced option you complete a thesis instead of a semester of electives, which allows you to have a stronger research focus to your master’s qualification

Career opportunities

In a globalised world, cross-cultural literacy has never been more important. Beyond further academic study, anthropology graduates work across a large range of sectors including government (multicultural affairs, migration, health, development aid), corporate sector (market research, social use of technology, cross-cultural management, consumer behaviour) and community work (non-governmental organisations in Australia and abroad).

Professional outcomes

ANU offers graduates comprehensive training in ethnographic methods and anthropological theory, followed by thematised progression in accordance with the student’s interests and future intentions for work or study. The program includes training in research and analysis, a broad suite of optional language training, applied training in social and cultural analysis through field-schools, internship placements as well as a thesis option. Beyond further academic study, anthropology graduates work across a large range of sectors including government (multicultural affairs, migration, health, development aid), corporate sector (market research, social use of technology, cross-cultural management, consumer behaviour) and community work (non-governmental organisations in Australia and abroad).
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Updated:  17 August 2018/Responsible Officer:  CASS Marketing & Communications/Page Contact:  CASS Marketing & Communications